Posts Categorized: GFG exhibitor!

show some skin

Face It

Face It: My skin would not have survived the winter without this super-hydrating face oil from Aromacentric.

Made from a base of 100% all-natural, extremely nourishing oils like avocado, carrot and borage, and blended with essential oils of neroli and jasmine, Face It is like a big glass of water for your face. (I stole this line from a testimonial because I couldn’t have said it better myself.)

My skin literally drinks it up every morning and stays hydrated for the entire day. It’s so pure and natural that when I apply it, I feel like I’m doing something good for myself. Face It has worked wonders for my normally dry, sensitive skin all winter long. And I wouldn’t have wanted to leave home without it when we went south. Smoothing it onto my face after a day in the sun and swim quenched my skin and made me feel like I was glowing.

Also in regular rotation in our bathroom: Aromacentric’s heavenly Eucalyptus, Lemon and Grapefruit Soaking Salts. The perfect end to any day. And, on my desk, right next to my laptop: their Rescue Essential Mist—a calming blend of frankincense, geranium and lavender—otherwise known as a “scent with benefits.” Spritz when stressed.

See and sniff for yourself…Aromacentric will be at the Gluten Free Garage on Sunday April 28th!

pizza four ways

Pizza night! We all made our own super-yummy and cheesy personal pies. Some had more vegetables than others.

 

O’Doughs gluten-free flax pizza kit is one of our go-to store-bought crusts. Terrific taste and texture!

 

Now if only we could get our hands on their new Bagel Thins…we can’t seem to find them anywhere and they sold out in a New York minute at the Gluten Free Garage!

guest blog: The Healthy Butcher

The Healthy Butcher‘s Queen West storefront. Their other location is on Eglinton Avenue at Avenue Road.

 

It’s that time of year again. The beautiful colours of autumn have vanished, leaving us with brisk temperatures and the craving for good ol’ comfort food. The delicate flavours we enjoy during the summer lack the oomph that our palates (and padding) require during winter. Enter the magical cooking technique called braising, the technique behind France’s famous coq au vin and boeuf borguignonne and Italy’s osso buco—chef talk for the slow cooking of cheap cuts of meat.

“Braising” sounds like a complicated culinary term, but really all it means is slow cooking in a flavourful liquid. The key is to start with a tough and inexpensive cut of meat—like a beef blade roast, cross cut roast, shanks or brisket or even pork shoulder roast. These cuts aren’t only less punishing on the pocketbook, they are best enjoyed through the braising method. The ultimate cooking pot for braising is an enameled cast iron pot like a Le Creuset; if you don’t have one, any heavy pot will do. Season the meat generously with salt and pepper and sear until browned all over. Remove it and set aside. Toss in chopped onions, celery and carrots (referred to as a mirepoix), then turn the heat down to medium to let the vegetables cook slowly and release their yumminess.

After about five minutes, deglaze with some wine or stock. “Deglazing” is the process of loosening those browned bits (the fond) stuck to the bottom of the pot after searing. Return the meat to the pot and add liquid to come at least three-quarters up the meat—a combination of flavourful stock and wine is perfect. Many recipes call for the addition of water; feel free to throw in spices, fresh herbs, garlic…you are limited only by your imagination.

Bring the liquid to a slow simmer (not a boil!). You can cook it on the stovetop or, if your pot is oven safe, throw it in the oven at 300°F. The meat is ready when it is “fork tender”—if you stick a fork into the meat and try to lift it, the meat won’t hold the fork and will just fall off. Total time: around 2.5 hours. (Hint: The meat will get much tougher during the cooking process before it gets tender; never fear, once the internal temperature is high enough it will fall apart.)

Our mothers may not have known the science behind their pot roast but it was still magic. At what point in history did the tradition of a Sunday pot roast with the family disappear? I think it should be mandatory.

 

Mario Fiorucci is the proprietor of The Healthy Butcher. He is also the founder of RealFoodToronto.com, Toronto’s newest and freshest source for Real Food, where you can learn about cooking and enjoy the food delivered to your door. Mario writes the Meet Your Meat column for KingWest.This article originally appeared in that magazine.

 

The Healthy Butcher will be bringing its meat and more (including Alba Lisa gourmet food products!) to the Gluten Free Garage!

a sweet bite

Local author and artist Cybèle Young‘s latest children’s book about one of our favourite things—food! Come meet her and buy her book at the Children’s Art Studio Pop-Up at the Gluten Free Garage this Sunday afternoon!

 

I tried to take just a few bites.

 

A little mid-day pick-me-up.

 

Chocolate, caramel, pecans! It’s hard to believe that this ooey-gooey goodness contains no dairy, eggs or cholesterol. Best of all, it’s made in a gluten-free facility.

 

It was love at first bite.

 

Thanks for the tummy love, Sweets from the Earth!

 

Nom…nom…nom…

 

Another one bites the dust.